SCOTUS: It Is So Ordered ~ Sunday Spotlight by Team Prism Book Alliance®

PBA_Sunday_Spotlight

SCOTUS: It Is So Ordered:

SCOTUS: It is so ordered

 

Most of you who are reading this know about one of the things that happened this past Friday, June 26th 2015: The Supreme Court of the US deciding that, yes, the 14th Amendment does in fact guarantee equality under the law when it comes to marriage, legalizing all marriages between two consenting adults, no matter their gender.

Sometime that day, we all decided that, yes, of course we would do a Sunday Spotlight about that for today, but how would it look? Basically, all at once, we decided anyone who wanted to talk about what this historic change in our country means to them could do just that.

As a lot of you know, Brandilyn is spending most of her time healing from injury and surgery, so we’re helping her in posting this, as well.

Without further ado, and in completely beautifully random order, here are thoughts from some of us here at Prism Book Alliance®

~Lirtle

Ameliah:

The Supreme Court’s ruling this morning is one of those “never forget where you were” moments. But unlike the JFK murder or 9/11, this one is a joyous moment.

The politicians and hate mongers of the LGBT community have really stepped up their game lately. So many people want to shut us out, dismiss us, some have threatened to kill themselves or divorce if we win the right to marry and one even tried to get a bill passed allowing people to shoot us in the head just for being gay (I use gay to cover all the letters, don’t be offended please). I will admit I’ll admit it was scary. We have worked so hard to be accepted but I really feared we would have to go back into hiding to stay safe.

With this ruling I feel like I can breathe again. A Huge weight has been lifted from my shoulders and heart. We now have the same rights as anyone else. We have a long way to go, legalization of gay adoption for a start but no more hiding. My partner came out to her new office today. I am now a proper partner and not a roommate.

There will always be people who have nothing but hate and prejudiced for some group of people or cause but today we were validated. We are now a part of “normal” society and this is so freeing!!

Christine:

When I first heard of the decision, my gut reaction was one of relief and joy for my friends in the LGBTQ community. Then I began thinking of its impact upon me and what it meant for me as an ally. I immediately logged on to my original social media page, which is peppered heavily with conservative friends who I have consistently endeavored not to offend with my more “liberal” views, and made my statement: “Love is love. It will always triumph over the evils of hatred, bigotry, and injustice. My heart is overflowing today.” It was a big step for me to splash my rainbows and love for this beautiful community all over that page, but the decision on Friday gave me the courage to just that: spread the love among the haters. I felt empowered and free, and I felt more my true self on that page than I ever have. This is what the decision means for all of us: validation and the right to basic human freedoms. I continue to celebrate with the members of the community and send colossal waves of love out to each of you.

Beverley:

Living in England the SCOTUS decision on 26th June 2015 would not seem to have a direct impact on me, but being a human being with friends and loved ones all over the world – this decision is phenomenal.
The United States has always been a little behind Europe in areas of social change. There are many reasons for this, and they are for another discussion, however being the largest industrialised nation in the west, many countries look to the US for confirmation of change. This decision I hope means that other nations – still trapped by archaic religious doctrines, fears and bigotry – will follow those European nations who have already embraced equality and same sex marriage, and be strengthened by this federal law in the United States.
Personally, it means that married friends in North America, can travel anywhere in their own nation, and have their marriage vows honoured. It means that others, who could not marry, simply because of a line drawn on a map, can now do so.
It means that in a world, where hatred and intolerance seem to be escalating daily – for one shining moment #LoveWins

Lirtle:

I’m just going to start with the very personal side of this: my aunt, my mom’s younger sister, has been with her partner for decades now, living in a state that, until this past Friday, would not allow them to marry simply for who they are. Now, today, in their home state, their home town, where they live, they can choose to get married if they want. With having the right comes having the choice, and that’s what it’s all about: inclusion, not exclusion. It’s now arrived in Texas. Every time I think about that, I get that lump in my throat, one that has been a near constant companion for the last 48 hours.

Broadening that just a bit, all of my friends who live here in Ohio now have that same right and same choice. Whenever, if ever, however, with whomever, they can get married and be afforded every single benefit that comes with it: hospital visitation, being listed as emergency contact, creating a family, sharing insurance, so many things that they too can now make a part of their lives without having to carry legal documents around with them 24-7 or having to explain why they are in fact one half of the other.

Equality. This is the one thing that continues to make it very difficult for me to completely understand those who don’t see and live this as a goal to achieve within his country, within communities and families and schools. Equality. We ALL just became freer due to the SCOTUS decision on Friday June 26th 2015. Whenever anyone is treated unequally, we ALL are unequal. It’s not “us” and “them”, it’s just “all of us”. Within a generation, they’ll be looking back at this day, like many in history, partially wondering why all the hubbub, as it will simply be “marriage” to many by then, while also feeling the emotion of the massive amount of support demonstrated all over this country, and the world. How can one not? I suffered no immunity, crying, lips trembling, feeling joy for today, as well as sadness for those who came long before who didn’t get to see and live this, reveling in the fact that it’s still taking time to sink in.

Love is love.

#equalitywins
Teresa:

I am so happy for my American friends!! Being in Canada, this right has been available for some time and I am glad all Americans can now marry who they want, regardless of gender!!

Ulysses:

First, fellow Prismites (?)…a little background.

My husband and I met in 1975, when I was a junior in college. I was twenty, Gary was 22. When we moved to New Jersey in 1980, and bought a house together, we created a special mortgage making us co-owners with rights of survivorship. There was no other way to make sure our families couldn’t step in and take it away from the survivor if one of us died. The very idea of marriage—or civil union, or domestic partnership—was the furthest thing from our minds in 1980. When we moved to NJ the gay groups there had just defeated an effort in the state legislature to re-criminalize gay sex (aka sodomy). Marriage? We just wanted protection from being considered criminals, or being fired for being gay. We had no rights.
After we adopted our two children in 1996, we were more legally tied to each other through the children than in any other way. So, the gradual emergence of legal ways to be a couple provided us with incremental anniversaries: Domestic Partnership (July 10); Civil Union (April 28, 2007) and finally Marriage (October 21, 2013). But this year we’ll mark our 40th anniversary on our real anniversary, December 31—the day, in 1975, when we declared our love for each other, and knew that we were a couple, forever. The SCOTUS ruling is HUGE, but it has just confirmed, and made legal in every state, what has always been true for us.
Ulysses Grant Dietz (my actual name)

Josie:

As an English woman I’ve always found it bizarre that each state of America can have different laws. For me SCOTUS means very little, I’m not American, I’m heterosexual, married, I don’t have children, but maybe, finally, SCOTUS means that all across America LGBT people will finally be treated equally over marriage, and I can only hope it ushers in a new era of true equality.

Feliz:

First of all, this is amazing, and something I can hardly believe got accomplished. Also, it’s something of a beacon of hope and at the same time, an admonitory finger to our own supreme court, our legislature. My country, who thinks herself so liberal, so open-minded, so democratic, might yet take a leaf out of USA’s book. Love is love!

PizzyGirl:

The SCOTUS decision had me in tears. Why? Because there was a small part of me that feared their ruling would be a negative one and when they announced that love is love, it brought forth all my pent up emotions. I have no words to describe my happiness right now. I know that not everything will be perfect immediately but this gives me so much hope that one day noone will blink at the fact that I want to marry another woman! That one day this will be just another part of life and will no longer warrant special designations or titles. This was such an important step towards the true meaning of equality! OMG I am just so happy.

Farewell Giveaway
I have a number of paperbacks, most of which are signed, to giveaway. Over the between now (11 Mar 2017) and 31 Mar 2017, every comment on the blog (this post and all other new posts), will be entered to win 1 of these paperbacks. There are also some misc swag items, so there will be a few packs of these to give away as well.

Thank you so much for your support over the last 4 years. Prism will be closing its doors on 1 April 2017. All content will remain available, but no new content will appear after 31 Mar 2017. As such all request forms have been turned off. Again Thank you,

Brandilyn
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Prism Book Alliance® assumes no liability for the ownership of photos or content used in guest posts and interviews.  The post author assumes all responsibility and liability for this content.

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