Carrie Pack on In The Present Tense ~ Guest Blog

Prism Book Alliance® would like to thank Carrie Pack for stopping by today.


Title: In The Present Tense
Author: Carrie Pack
Publisher: Interlude Press
Cover Artist: CB Messer
Genre: Bisexual, Contemporary, Fiction, Romance, Science Fiction
Release Date: 05/19/2016


Miles Lawson goes to sleep dreaming of a future with his boyfriend Adam, but wakes to find he is married to Ana, an acquaintance from high school. When he learns he has been time traveling, Miles is consumed with finding a cure for his rare condition—and finding his first love. But will he be able to convince Adam he is telling the truth before it’s too late?

Ten Books that influenced me

Ten Books that influenced me

Failure is Not an Option by Gene Kranz

Apollo 13 is one of my favorite movies of all time. It started my obsession with the space program, but this book solidified it. It may be nonfiction but it reads like a gripping novel with Kranz’s first-hand account of the early days of NASA up to the beginnings of the shuttle program. Failure is Not an Option made me realize nonfiction could be as compelling as fiction.

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J.K. Rowling

Look, I’ll just come right out and say it, I’m obsessed with time travel, so this one was a no-brainer. I love Rowling’s ability to loop the story back on itself and create a time paradox while still telling a compelling and captivating story. It’s still my favorite book of the series and a big part of the reason I wanted to write time travel.

Davita’s Harp by Chaim Potok

I read this in high school as required reading, but it was my first experience of falling in love with an author. I devoured all of Potok’s back catalog and loved every single one. Still, it’s this tale of a young girl growing up Jewish and coming to terms with her own identity that remains my favorite.

Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell

A lot of my faves on this list include movie adaptations, but this one is unique because I had loved the movie for decades before I read the book. I put it off because I was afraid it would sully my love of the movie version—don’t movie versions always pale in comparison to the book? I was pleasantly surprised to find I enjoyed the book in its own right. And despite its cringe-worthy glorification of slavery and the Old South, I can still appreciate Mitchell’s epic masterpiece for what it is: a groundbreaking romance that inspired me to become a writer.

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland/Through the Looking-Glass by Lewis Carroll

I grouped these together because they are inseparable in my mind. Alice is and always has been my favorite literary heroine because of her chutzpah and whimsy in the face of a completely nonsensical world. What I love most about these books is that they require you surrender to the ridiculous characters and scenery—but not without providing you a little lesson along the way.

The Other Boleyn Girl by Philippa Gregory

This book cemented my love of historical fiction, particularly the type of book that takes real historical figures and fleshes out their lives via the author’s imagination. I still hope to one day tackle this genre.

In Cold Blood by Truman Capote

If you’ve never read this true crime novel, you’re missing out. Capote’s writing is dark and twisted and oddly makes you feel sympathetic toward two murderers, who killed a family while they slept—and all for less than fifty dollars. The story is haunting, and it’s so good at blurring the lines between fact and fantasy, book stores rarely know whether to file it under nonfiction or fiction. It also inspired me to become a writer because it made me realize I could apply my journalism skills to fiction.

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

This is another book I read for school that really stuck with me. Bradbury is famous in the speculative fiction genre, but in my opinion, this is his best work.  It’s a terrifying take on a dystopian future where firemen start fires instead of putting them out. And the fuel for their fires? Books. I think Fahrenheit 451 might be the sole reason I majored in journalism. If this book doesn’t light the Freedom of Speech fire beneath you, nothing will.

The Scarecrow of Oz by L. Frank Baum

Most people would pick Baum’s best-known book, but for whatever reason, this book made me obsessed with the Land of Oz. When I was in second grade, I checked this book out at least a dozen times. So much so that the librarian eventually persuaded me to read the rest of the series. It set off a lifelong passion for reading that hasn’t let up since.

The Prisoner of Heaven by Carlos Ruiz Zafón

This is my most recent addition to this list but it earned its place easily. Zafón’s writing is magical, a feat even more amazing when you realize his books have been translated from Spanish. Kudos to his translator because the lyrical and magical style just makes the story come alive.


In The Present Tense on Goodreads
Interlude Press
Amazon US
Amazon UK
Amazon CA
All Romance eBooks
Barnes & Noble


About the Author

Carrie Pack is the author of Designs On You and a part-time college professor who recently left her job in marketing to actively pursue her writing career. Carrie lives in Florida, which she fondly calls America’s Wang, with her husband and four cats.

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2 thoughts on “Carrie Pack on In The Present Tense ~ Guest Blog

  1. Those are really great books… I specially agree with Fahrenheit and In Cold Blood.. I read the first one when I was fourteen and Bradbury really impressed me. As for the second one, it changed my views on journalism and true crime story as well. Just impressive!

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