L.C. Davis on Kingdom of Night: Pendulum ~ Guest Blog Rafflecopter Giveaway

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Title: Kingdom of Night: Pendulum
Author: L.C. Davis
Publisher: Self Published
Genre: Action/Adventure, BDSM, Gay, Gay Fiction, Gay Romance, Menage/Poly, Paranormal
Release Date: 04/10/2016


Remus Black is still reeling from an abusive relationship that stripped him of everything — including his desire for love. Now all he wants is a fresh start halfway across the country, but his new roommate is determined to draw him into his strange world of chains, half-naked men and the infamous Lodge, a BDSM club as lavish as it is secretive.

When Remus is entered into the Lodge’s annual Alpha’s Pet contest against his will, he finds himself thrown to the Wolf Pack, the very type of men he needs to avoid. What’s worse is that the wolves immediately label him a submissive, something he swore he would never be again. Things get even stranger when “wolf” turns out to be far more literal than Remus ever imagined. When both the next-in-line for Alpha and his outcast brother claim Remus as their own, the entire pack is thrown into chaos.

Can Remus learn to embrace the power of submission and choose between the brothers before their rivalry tears the pack apart, or will the tension between them unravel his own sordid past?

Monsters Who Break the Rules (And Some Who Don’t)

From the moment I smuggled a dog-eared thrift store copy of Edith Hamilton’s “Mythology” into my homeschool curriculum, gods, goddesses and monsters have had a significant role in my life. It’s no surprise that those themes have carried over into just about everything I’ve written to date. It’s kind of a running joke that if I ever write something that doesn’t have a fanged, winged or horned cast, I’ve been bodysnatched.

Over the years, the thing I’ve grown to love most about writing in the paranormal genre is the creative opportunity provided by existing supernatural conventions. Being part of a BDSM-themed series, one of the main ideas explored in Pendulum is the freedom to be found within limitation, and paranormal romance is an amazing genre in which to explore that.

Take the classic vampire tropes for example. There are a lot of people who would say that writing vampire characters is limiting because it’s been done so often and the tropes are so solidified in people’s minds. I would argue that yes, it is limiting, and that’s a great thing! Sure, you can reinvent the wheel by creating a whole new species with traits that defy expectations at every turn, and I’ve read plenty of books where this is done to great effect. Maybe someday I’ll try my hand at creating an alien race or an entirely new type of monster, but for now I enjoy the challenge of working within the confines of the creatures of legend. I love the thrill of subverting some of the expectations you have in the back of your mind as to what the things that go bump in the night should look and act like while fulfilling others to a T.

In Pendulum, my main character, Remus, finds himself thrown into what seems like a very binary world of vampires and werewolves. The way the lore is presented to him, werewolves are good and noble creatures, while vampires are bloodthirsty killers without any morality to speak of. Certainly the sexy yet charming shifters Remus meets at the Lodge and my endearingly psychotic vampiress, Sarah, play into these notions, but I like to think the truth is a bit more nuanced than my characters give it credit for. By his mere existence, Remus challenges his own beliefs about what it means to be a vampire or a werewolf, and calls it into question for the twin shifters who fall for him as well.

When it came to creating lore for the world Remus, Victor and Sebastian inhabit, it was important to me that there were no strict “good guy” and “bad guy” delineations. While Pendulum is told from the perspective of a presumed human narrator being inducted into the world of the supernatural by a house full of werewolves, I wanted it to be clear that there are other worlds carrying on around them. In addition to fleshing out the Wolf Pack, Pendulum was my chance to explore the world of vampire tropes with characters who fall just shy of them by being cold but not devoid of emotion, aggressive but not inherently malicious and self-serving but not without loyalty.

Then there are the hunters. I always felt like hunters got the short end of the stake, so to speak (that’s a bad joke of Sebastian-level proportions). From humans with a grudge against the undead to those with a supernatural destiny to keep vampires in line, hunters have always intrigued me for the fact that they tend to exist because other supernaturals do. I wanted to explore the idea of hunters as a supernatural race unto themselves and see how that would play out. I wasn’t quite prepared for the race of xenophobic Stepford zombies that resulted, but that’s part of what makes mythological world building in this genre so much fun! In my world, hunters are a race of reanimated humans who call themselves the Family and voluntarily give themselves over to the possession of a malicious entity known as the Patriarch in the interest of exterminating all other supernatural creatures.

The hunters are far from being the biggest or baddest monsters in my little universe, but they’re the last ones I’d want to sit across from at the dinner table—even if they would probably serve that dinner as a seven-course meal on fine china with a lovely floral centerpiece. Creatures who skulk around in the dark have their appeal, but the idea of monsters who thrive in the sunlight, pride themselves on being the pillars of the community and dagger other monsters while wearing sweater sets is where the real chills are, in this writer’s opinion.

Creating your own mythology, for those of you who are lucky enough to plan rather than taking dictation from unruly characters who pretty much do whatever they please, is one of the most enjoyable parts of writing, or at least it should be. Unfortunately, I think a lot of writers become intimidated by the pressure to create monsters and other creatures the likes of which no one has ever read. While novelty is its own virtue, I would argue that it’s also okay to put your own spin on existing themes. Telling a story that’s never been told is great, but sometimes telling a story everyone has already heard from a perspective they’ve never considered is even better.


Kingdom of Night: Pendulum on Goodreads

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About the Author

L.C. Davis has been writing since he can remember. He started out jotting down tales about his imaginary friends in spiral notebooks and an old typewriter. Since then, he’s upgraded to a laptop but he still prefers the company of his characters to 3D people most of the time. As a transgender author, L.C. is dedicated to increasing trans visibility in the romance genre one supernatural tale at a time.

When he isn’t watching 90s sitcoms and Sci-Fi with his partner, you can find Lucien attempting to write while his two cats and fluffy lunkhead of a dog vie for his attention.

L.C. enjoys getting feedback from readers and can be contacted on Goodreads or at luciendavisofficial@gmail.com.

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